Data for 8th to 10th May 2021

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Hello Friends!

 

For clarity, all today’s stats come from Government stats at https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-daily-data-for-scotland/

I have left the updates over the weekend because the Government doesn’t update the detailed statistics at the weekend.

 

Data:

 

Date New +ve tests (%change from previous day New tests NHS tests Community Tests % positive +ve tests inc repeats (% +ve)
8/5 224 (⇩5.1%) 21,669 12,255 9,414 1.0 256 (1.2%)
9/5 200 (⇩11%) 13,976 5,630 8,346 1.4 215 (1.5%)
10/5 168 (⇩16%) 11,516 5,848 5,668 1.5 189 (1.6%)

 

Date Newly tested individuals reported
8/5 3240
9/5 2794
10/5 2674

 

Local positive tests numbers from previous 24 hours:

Date 8/5 9/5 10/5
Ayrshire & Arran 15 10 12
Borders 2 1 0
Dumfries & Galloway 1 2 0
Fife 16 13 13
Forth Valley 5 7 14
Grampian 19 23 20
Greater Glasgow & Clyde 88 77 49
Highland 1 3 4
Lanarkshire 29 24 28
Lothian 33 24 17
Orkney 0 0 0
Shetland 0 0 0
Tayside 15 16 11
Western Isles 0 0 0

 

Hospitals etc

 

Date Deaths ITU with +ve test ITU patients over 28 days Hospital Occupancy

(%age of delayed discharges)

Delayed in hospital
8/5 0 9 9 64 (6.3%) 1011
9/5 0 6 10 65 (6.4%) 1011
10/5 0 6 10 72 (7.1%) 1011

 

Vaccinations

 

Date Cumulative first doses Cumulative second doses Daily first dose Daily second dose
8/5 2,883,384 1,450,798 6751 26590
9/5 2,897,975 1,468,296 14591 17498
10/5 2,909,156 1,485,296 11181 17000

 

ONS Prevalence Survey

The ONS estimates 1 in 760 people had the coronavirus in the week 26th April to 2nd May. This is a very low rate and getting smaller. The previous week the rate was 1 in 640. We are certainly out of coronavirus season and came out of any epidemic a long long time ago!

 

Comment:

Graph 1 – ‘Cases’ are flat. As expected as we come in to summer.

Graph 1

 

Graph 2 – Positivity is very far below epidemic levels and stable at around 1%. We have been below 5%, which is the WHO epidemic level since early February.

Graph 2

 

Graph 3 – The number of newly tested individuals is flat, indicating no widespread illness in the community driving people to seek tests.

Graph 3

 

Graph 4 – Hospital occupancy (patients with a positive covid test) is now at 6% of the delayed discharge number. Deaths are at zero.

Graph 4

 

Graph 5 – ITU occupancy and deaths are on the floor. It seems all the patients with a positive covid test in ITU are long term patients. I’m confused there are now more long term patients than overall patients. Clearly, there is an error here. In my previous understanding, or in the data input from the Government. But the headline figure is 6 patients in ITU in today’s announcement.

Graph 5

 

Graph 6 – I have added the Grampian trace, which we’re following with interest because of the recent ‘surge’ being reported there. You can see there is no surge in the region as a whole, so quite why we need to be worrying about this, from an NHS protection point of view particularly, is anyone’s guess.

Graph 6

 

Graph 7 – NHS vs Community testing. It will be interesting to see where the number of NHS tests peaks this coming week.  Last week and the week before saw the highest number of tests ever undertaken by the NHS. I hope they are going to start reducing this. It is offering Scotland no benefit whatsoever.

Graph 7

 

Graph 8 – Hospital occupancy by region. Only 4 regions have more than 4 covid patients in all their hospitals combined. Numbers have risen in Greater Glasgow and Clyde and Lothian, but still very low. Grampian (includes Moray) has seen no change.

Graph 8

 

Graphs 9&10 – Vaccinations are very interesting. First doses are flat and second doses are being delivered at a much faster rate but slowing significantly. There is something going on here – I’m just not quite sure what it is!

Graphs 9&10

 

Tweet and share!

Lots of love  ❤

Stay sane 🧠 Stay strong 💪

Christine x

 

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